Flat Closure Now nonprofit organization for breast cancer and mastectomy patients in need of mastectomy pictures, patient stories, support and education on aesthetic flat closure, explant breast implants, and going flat.
Flat Closure Now nonprofit organization for breast cancer and mastectomy patients in need of mastectomy pictures, patient stories, support and education on aesthetic flat closure, explant breast implants, and going flat.
Flat Closure Now nonprofit organization for breast cancer and mastectomy patients in need of mastectomy pictures, patient stories, support and education on aesthetic flat closure, explant breast implants, and going flat.

Explant
with

Flat Closure

FCN's Treasurer, Katie P. Fink, after removing her breast implants.

Before we begin, it's important to note that each mastectomy patient's medical history is unique with different variables that may affect the final outcome.

The information provided below is meant to be used as a guide, but is not comprehensive and may not apply to your situation. We are breast cancer patients, not doctors.
**
 Information provided by Flat Closure NOW shouldn't be taken as a substitute for medical advice from a licensed breast surgeon or oncologist. **


Please speak to your healthcare provider if you are considering explant.

fcn president Sondra price's Implants & Capsules after Total Capsulectomy Explant 

Meeting with Explant Surgeons

 

Consulting with a surgeon about explanting breast implants can seem daunting, but know that you are not alone. Many, many mastectomy patients have traveled this road before you (including us!). We hope that the guidance below helps in communicating your wishes with ease and clarity.



Write down your "why"
 

Whether it is because your health is suffering, secondary cancer concerns, or other reasons, it's important to articulate your honest, authentic feelings when meeting with the explant surgeon - even if they are raw. Write it down if you need to! The “whys” help medical providers understand the patient’s perspective.


Show your surgeon photos

Be sure to show your surgeon photos of the aesthetic flat closure you'd like. You can find all sorts of gorgeous mastectomy pictures right here in our flat photo gallery. Though your particular result may differ from the photo you show your surgeon (which is why it's important to ask questions - more on that below), it still helps your surgeon visualize your ideal outcome. 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Ask questions!

 

We advise patients to always “interview” their medical providers when it comes to their mastectomy surgery or breast implant removal. This is important because not all medical providers are created equal (it’s one of the reasons we created this org!); some providers will listen without judgement, support your choice, and provide an exceptional aesthetic flat closure while others will not. Below are some questions we suggest asking to help you understand how they will achieve an aesthetic flat closure in your specific case and if that surgeon is the right fit for you. You can download the list here - print it and take it with you to your appointment! 

Ask the Explant Surgeon - Flat Closure N
This is Aesthetic Flat Closure Mastectom
Listen to your intuition

 

Make sure to have your wishes to have an "explant with aesthetic flat closure" notated in your medical record. ​​Evaluate your surgeon’s response. Do they accept and respect your decision? If there’s pushback, it may be time to find a new surgeon. Listen to your intuition! If you feel uncertain about your surgeon’s competence or their commitment to producing an aesthetic flat closure, you should seek a second opinion.

Frequently Asked Questions About Explant

Q. I have an Oregon automobile insurance policy. What coverage do I have if I am hit as a pedestrian?


A. In Oregon, every automobile insurance policy has four areas of coverage: Liability, Personal Injury Protection (PIP), Property Damage, and Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist Coverage (UM/UIM). If you are hit as a pedestrian the coverage lines that will apply to you are PIP and UM/UIM.




Q. What is PIP?


A. PIP (Personal Injury Protection) covers medical expenses and lost wages if you are injured in a collision. In Oregon, the minimum amount of coverage is $15,000. PIP is (usually) “first party” coverage which means your automobile insurance covers your medical bills and wage loss despite the collision being the fault of another road user.




Q. I walk as well as drive, do I need to buy an additional insurance policy that covers me?


A. It depends. In Oregon, your automobile insurance will cover you in some ways when you are walking. If you are injured in a collision with a motor vehicle, your PIP insurance will pay your medical bills. However, if you are injured in an accident that does not involve a motor vehicle, like you trip over a pavement defect, PIP will not cover you, but your health insurance would




Q. I usually walk for transportation. I don’t own a car. Can I get insurance?


A. Yes, so long as you’re a licensed driver. Some national insurers offer insurance for drivers who don’t own their own cars. These policies usually need to be purchased through a broker or local agent, though. This coverage is very affordable and offer the same protection as the coverage purchased when a person owns an automobile.




Q. Do I still need a big policy if I mostly walk?


A. Yes. It is just as important to have adequate insurance when you are walking. In Oregon the amount of your UM/UIM insurance is the same as your liability insurance. Therefore higher limits means more protection for you in case you are injured by an underinsured or uninsured motorist.




Q. I was hit by a car while walking and had to go to the hospital, how do I pay the bills? I have automobile insurance and health insurance.


A. Since you have your own automobile insurance, your PIP coverage will become the “primary” insurer to pay the bills. Any bills not covered by your automobile insurance will be paid by your health insurance. Additionally, any bill not paid by either of your insurers, like co-pays, can be submitted to the motor vehicle driver’s PIP insurer. Your insurers will then seek repayment from the negligent driver’s insurer in a process called subrogation.




Q. I was hit by a car by a car while I was walking. I had to go to the hospital. How do I pay the bills? I don’t have automobile insurance or health insurance.


A. In Oregon, pedestrians can access the PIP coverage of the motor vehicle that hit them, regardless of whose fault the collision was. As a result, if you are struck and injured by a motor vehicle while walking, your medical bills and wage loss will be covered as if you had automobile insurance yourself.




Q. I was hit by a car while walking and now I can’t work. How do I recover my lost wages?


A. Your lost wages will be paid by PIP coverage, but not 100%. First, you have to be unable to work for two weeks. Even then you will receive only 70% of your gross pay up to $3,000 a month. The other portions of wage loss not covered will need to be recovered from the driver’s insurance company through a settlement or trial.




Q. I was hit by a car while walking and I don’t think I was hurt. Should I still file a claim with the driver’s insurance company?


A. Yes. First, sometimes injuries can stay “hidden” for several months. Second, by reporting a driver that hit you to their insurer, you are ensuring some repercussion (higher insurance rates) for their negligent driving.




Q. I was hit by a car while walking and the driver did not have insurance. What can I do? I have automobile insurance.


A. Your insurance policy contains UM/UIM coverage which will cover you if you are hit by an uninsured or underinsured (damages exceed their policy) driver. Your insurer essentially steps into the shoes of the negligent driver’s insurance (if they had any).




Q. I was hit by a car while walking and the driver did not have insurance. What can I do? I do not have automobile insurance.


A. First, file a police report. If you have medical insurance, that coverage will pay your medical bills. If you do not have medical insurance then you may need to find a treating doctor that will accept payments or treat you for a reduced charge. If the uninsured driver struck you while engaged in a crime (assault, driving under the influence) then you may be able to obtain compensation from the Oregon Crime Victim’s Fund.